Findings of ceramic artifacts shed light on Vietnamese history

December, 16/2020 - 17:31
A large number of ancient Chinese porcelain dating back to Tang, Song, Yuan, Ming and Qing dynasties have been discovered at the relic of the Imperial Citadel of Thăng Long.

 

A large number of ancient Chinese porcelain that date back to Tang, Song, Yuan, Ming and Qing dynasties have been discovered at the relic of the Imperial Citadel of Thăng Long. — Photo nhandan.com.vn

HÀ NỘI A large number of ancient Chinese porcelain dating back to Tang, Song, Yuan, Ming and Qing dynasties have been discovered at the relic of the Imperial Citadel of Thăng Long.

The announcement was made by Associate Professor, Dr. Bùi Minh Trí, head of Centre for Thăng Long Royal Citadel Research at a seminar on Tuesday.

The seminar, entitled Chinese Porcelain in the Song Dynasty in the Thăng Long Palace, was held by the Centre for Thăng Long Royal Citadel Research under the Vietnam Academy of Social Sciences. It aimed to serve the research and scientific documentation of Vietnamese and Chinese ceramics in the Lý – Trần period, from the beginning of the 11th century to the end of the 14th century.

According to the Trí, the porcelain of the Song Dynasty (960 -1279) unearthed at the relic is extremely rare and unique. Such findings are vivid examples revealing that Chinese porcelain was used in the ancient Thăng Long Palace.

“At the same time, it reflects the exchanging relationship between China and the capital city of Thăng Long in history,” he added.

The findings also open up direction for research on the relationship between the porcelain discovered at the Imperial Citadel of Thăng Long with contemporary Chinese porcelain.

“It is also a meaningful scientific issue in researching and understanding the relationship, economic and cultural exchange between Thăng Long (Vietnam) and China in history,” said the associate professor who is also an expert on Vietnamese ancient pottery.

At the relic of the Imperial Citadel of Thăng Long, archaeologists also found many Vietnamese ceramics from the Lý dynasty (1009–1225) with a technological level equivalent to those of the Song Dynasty of China and with many indistinguishable similarities.

The seminar provides a scientific basis for clarifying the fundamental value of archaeological discoveries and practically contributes to the preservation and promotion of the value of the heritage site.

Commenting on the similarities and differences between the types of porcelain in the Song and Lý Dynasties, Dr. Nguyễn Đình Chiến from Vietnam National Museum of History said the comparison results partly reflected that Vietnamese porcelain had absorbed certain influences in shaping and decorating stages, thereby showcasing the creativity and achievements of the profession in Vietnamese history.

“Lý Dynasty was a very glorious era for Vietnamese ceramic as the period produced various glazed lines like celadon, white glaze, brown glaze and green glaze. From the brown glaze line, the Lý Dynasty developed to brown floral pottery, a brilliant and prideful achievement of the profession during the Lý Dynasty,” he said.

At the seminar, the specialists also discussed and analysed many issues such as the excavation of Song porcelain in the Vườn Hồng (Rose Garden) area; characteristic and the scale of Chinese ceramic exported to Africa during the 9th and 10th centuries and its variations. VNS

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