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Asian aquaculture diseases discussed

Update: November, 25/2014 - 09:59
The five-day DAA9 will discuss issues related to bio-security compliance, parasitic diseases, early mortality syndrome in shrimp, fish viral disease, fish and shrimp immunology, diseases affecting tilapia and catfish, aquatic diseases, and husbandry and management. — File Photo

HCM CITY (VNS) — A triennial Asian symposium on diseases affecting aquaculture opened in HCM City yesterday, with 300 local and international scientists, researchers, and business executives taking part.

The five-day DAA9 will discuss issues related to bio-security compliance, parasitic diseases, early mortality syndrome in shrimp, fish viral disease, fish and shrimp immunology, diseases affecting tilapia and catfish, aquatic diseases, and husbandry and management.

"The Asian region as a whole has excelled in aquatic animal health research over the last 25 years and this is illustrated by the excellent collaborations that are being sustained between aquatic animal health professionals of Asia Pacific and reflected in the quality of science outputs from the region," Chadag Vishnumurthy Mohan, Chairman of the Asian Fisheries Society's Fish Health Section (FHS), said.

Addressing the opening session, Deputy Minister of Agriculture and Rural Development Vu Van Tam said DAA9 offered a good opportunity to scientists, managers, and businesses involved in aquaculture and aquatic animal health in Asia as well as around the world to share useful research results and experiences related to prevention and control of diseases.

It was also a great opportunity for businesses to promote aquaculture activities, aquatic and aquatic produce, aquatic feed, aquatic veterinary products and technology related to aquatic animal health, he said.

It offered Viet Nam and its international partners an opportunity to expand research collaboration and market aquatic produce and veterinary products to boost development of the aquatic sector and reduce pollution, he added.

According to recent Food and Agriculture Organisation of the United Nations (FAO) estimates, considering the potential impacts of global population and income growth on fish consumption, fish demand is expected to reach 261 million tonnes in 2030.

To meet this demand, future fish supply from aquaculture needed to increase significantly, Rohana Subasinghe, senior aquaculture officer of the FAO's Fisheries and Aquaculture Department, said.

From past experience it was clear that producers would always attempt to bridge any demand-supply gap even at the cost of sustainability, he warned.

Historically, disease has proved a major constraint to efficient production in many aquaculture systems, he said.

Major improvements had been made in recent years in the understanding of the aetiology and epidemiology of fish diseases, and aquaculture producers in many countries had dramatically improved their husbandry practices with greater focus now on fish health and welfare, he said.

Many serious infectious diseases had been controlled through new therapeutics and vaccines, but new disease problems were emerging and previously rare diseases were becoming much more prevalent, making continued vigilance and solution development vital, he added.

Mohan from FHS said DAA9 had attracted over 260 high-quality research submissions from the Asia-Pacific and other parts of the world.

The growing interest in emerging diseases, diseases of fast developing aquaculture items like tilapia and catfish and fish immunology was very evident in the DAA9 scientific programme, he said.

The symposium, organised by the FHS in co-operation with the Department of Animal Health, ends this Friday. — VNS

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