Updated  
March, 16 2014 17:55:31

Teed Off (Mar. 16, 2014)

with Robert Bicknell

OK… stress and burnout have firmly taken hold and I need a bit of a holiday before my feeble little mind cracks completely. Yeah, I know… whoops, too late. (Beat ya to it, didn't I?)

So, I'm taking off to Ho Tram for a ribbon cutting ceremony at the newest and what, including me, some call the "best golf course" in Viet Nam. That's what I said when I first visited the site. I also said it after the second visit when I played the first nine holes.

I am pretty sure my original opinion will hold up after this visit and the full 18 holes, but we will see. After all, I wouldn't want Ben Styles to get complacent. I'm sure a few hours on the beach will also put me into a nicer frame of mind. To be honest, I've been a rather ill-tempered grouch lately.

In the movie Caddyshack, Rodney Dangerfield had a golf bag which gave him clubs via pneumatic air compression and a remote control. It also had a radio, TV and beer on tap.

He also had a putter which he claimed was given to him by Albert Einstein and had laser assisted alignment, etc. Yes, I know Einstein wasn't around at that time, but that's the point of the joke and the character. Bigger and louder than life.

The movie also had a golf course superintendent who, when he wasn't lopping off the tops of flowers or making explicit gestures with a ball washer, was also growing his own special version of "grass". OK, he also blew up the course while trying to get rid of a single gopher, but you need to see the movie to understand it. And, yes, there are many superintendents who are very close to that character running around loose without medication.

I mention the movie because of the golf bag. Strange and highly non-conforming equipment has been around for a very long time and will continue to be. It's just part of the game and a requirement of innovation. Some pass the test and make it to the shelves, others remain forever in legend.

Over the years, I have seen or heard of clubs made from exotic metals, including parts of a Russian space station, an ICBM and even depleted uranium. Yes, the last one was never put into production and would probably glow in the dark.

I also remember a driver in the 80's which had tennis strings instead of a driver face. I hit a golf ball with a tennis racquet once time and the ball went 475 yards. Unfortunately, it is illegal and would probably require having your driver restrung a few times per year. I cannot belive I actually wrote "having your driver restrung" because that is just soooo wrong on many levels.

I also remember some maniac who stuck a shotgun shell behind the face of a driver with the idea that once you pull the trigger, the faceplate would bash into the ball and send it screaming down the fairway. As you might expect, this was greeted with little enthusiasm by course owners who didn't have a shooting range on the property. As far as I remember, they had a problem with keeping the golf ball from being shredded as well as the police.

So, when I heard about a TaylorMade driver prototype which featured little stabilizing wings coming out of the side and top, I had to smile because, as a fellow maniac, I can fully understand the designer's enthusiasm for such a club. Sure, it's non-conforming, but ya gotta think outside the box in order to invent things that will conform.

Called "MOAD" (The Mother of All Drivers), it had spring loaded wings. They followed that up with "MOAI" (The Mother of All Irons) which had the same features.

Illegal balls have always been a problem ever since the USA changed to a larger ball while England had the smaller ball which played much better in the wind. Gee, links-style courses with lots of wind, go figure.

Now there is a ball with a steel centre called "OnCore" which is supposed to fly perfectly straight. And, yes, the original design was approved by the USGA.

I cannot wait to see if a super magnet will affect it… VNS

TEED OFF

with Robert Bicknell

OK… stress and burnout have firmly taken hold and I need a bit of a holiday before my feeble little mind cracks completely. Yeah, I know… whoops, too late. (Beat ya to it, didn't I?)

So, I'm taking off to Ho Tram for a ribbon cutting ceremony at the newest and what, including me, some call the "best golf course" in Viet Nam. That's what I said when I first visited the site. I also said it after the second visit when I played the first nine holes.

I am pretty sure my original opinion will hold up after this visit and the full 18 holes, but we will see. After all, I wouldn't want Ben Styles to get complacent. I'm sure a few hours on the beach will also put me into a nicer frame of mind. To be honest, I've been a rather ill-tempered grouch lately.

In the movie Caddyshack, Rodney Dangerfield had a golf bag which gave him clubs via pneumatic air compression and a remote control. It also had a radio, TV and beer on tap.

He also had a putter which he claimed was given to him by Albert Einstein and had laser assisted alignment, etc. Yes, I know Einstein wasn't around at that time, but that's the point of the joke and the character. Bigger and louder than life.

The movie also had a golf course superintendent who, when he wasn't lopping off the tops of flowers or making explicit gestures with a ball washer, was also growing his own special version of "grass". OK, he also blew up the course while trying to get rid of a single gopher, but you need to see the movie to understand it. And, yes, there are many superintendents who are very close to that character running around loose without medication.

I mention the movie because of the golf bag. Strange and highly non-conforming equipment has been around for a very long time and will continue to be. It's just part of the game and a requirement of innovation. Some pass the test and make it to the shelves, others remain forever in legend.

Over the years, I have seen or heard of clubs made from exotic metals, including parts of a Russian space station, an ICBM and even depleted uranium. Yes, the last one was never put into production and would probably glow in the dark.

I also remember a driver in the 80's which had tennis strings instead of a driver face. I hit a golf ball with a tennis racquet once time and the ball went 475 yards. Unfortunately, it is illegal and would probably require having your driver restrung a few times per year. I cannot belive I actually wrote "having your driver restrung" because that is just soooo wrong on many levels.

I also remember some maniac who stuck a shotgun shell behind the face of a driver with the idea that once you pull the trigger, the faceplate would bash into the ball and send it screaming down the fairway. As you might expect, this was greeted with little enthusiasm by course owners who didn't have a shooting range on the property. As far as I remember, they had a problem with keeping the golf ball from being shredded as well as the police.

So, when I heard about a TaylorMade driver prototype which featured little stabilizing wings coming out of the side and top, I had to smile because, as a fellow maniac, I can fully understand the designer's enthusiasm for such a club. Sure, it's non-conforming, but ya gotta think outside the box in order to invent things that will conform.

Called "MOAD" (The Mother of All Drivers), it had spring loaded wings. They followed that up with "MOAI" (The Mother of All Irons) which had the same features.

Illegal balls have always been a problem ever since the USA changed to a larger ball while England had the smaller ball which played much better in the wind. Gee, links-style courses with lots of wind, go figure.

Now there is a ball with a steel centre called "OnCore" which is supposed to fly perfectly straight. And, yes, the original design was approved by the USGA.

I cannot wait to see if a super magnet will affect it… — VNS

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Updated  
March, 16 2014 17:55:31

Teed Off (Mar. 16, 2014)

with Robert Bicknell

OK… stress and burnout have firmly taken hold and I need a bit of a holiday before my feeble little mind cracks completely. Yeah, I know… whoops, too late. (Beat ya to it, didn't I?)

So, I'm taking off to Ho Tram for a ribbon cutting ceremony at the newest and what, including me, some call the "best golf course" in Viet Nam. That's what I said when I first visited the site. I also said it after the second visit when I played the first nine holes.

I am pretty sure my original opinion will hold up after this visit and the full 18 holes, but we will see. After all, I wouldn't want Ben Styles to get complacent. I'm sure a few hours on the beach will also put me into a nicer frame of mind. To be honest, I've been a rather ill-tempered grouch lately.

In the movie Caddyshack, Rodney Dangerfield had a golf bag which gave him clubs via pneumatic air compression and a remote control. It also had a radio, TV and beer on tap.

He also had a putter which he claimed was given to him by Albert Einstein and had laser assisted alignment, etc. Yes, I know Einstein wasn't around at that time, but that's the point of the joke and the character. Bigger and louder than life.

The movie also had a golf course superintendent who, when he wasn't lopping off the tops of flowers or making explicit gestures with a ball washer, was also growing his own special version of "grass". OK, he also blew up the course while trying to get rid of a single gopher, but you need to see the movie to understand it. And, yes, there are many superintendents who are very close to that character running around loose without medication.

I mention the movie because of the golf bag. Strange and highly non-conforming equipment has been around for a very long time and will continue to be. It's just part of the game and a requirement of innovation. Some pass the test and make it to the shelves, others remain forever in legend.

Over the years, I have seen or heard of clubs made from exotic metals, including parts of a Russian space station, an ICBM and even depleted uranium. Yes, the last one was never put into production and would probably glow in the dark.

I also remember a driver in the 80's which had tennis strings instead of a driver face. I hit a golf ball with a tennis racquet once time and the ball went 475 yards. Unfortunately, it is illegal and would probably require having your driver restrung a few times per year. I cannot belive I actually wrote "having your driver restrung" because that is just soooo wrong on many levels.

I also remember some maniac who stuck a shotgun shell behind the face of a driver with the idea that once you pull the trigger, the faceplate would bash into the ball and send it screaming down the fairway. As you might expect, this was greeted with little enthusiasm by course owners who didn't have a shooting range on the property. As far as I remember, they had a problem with keeping the golf ball from being shredded as well as the police.

So, when I heard about a TaylorMade driver prototype which featured little stabilizing wings coming out of the side and top, I had to smile because, as a fellow maniac, I can fully understand the designer's enthusiasm for such a club. Sure, it's non-conforming, but ya gotta think outside the box in order to invent things that will conform.

Called "MOAD" (The Mother of All Drivers), it had spring loaded wings. They followed that up with "MOAI" (The Mother of All Irons) which had the same features.

Illegal balls have always been a problem ever since the USA changed to a larger ball while England had the smaller ball which played much better in the wind. Gee, links-style courses with lots of wind, go figure.

Now there is a ball with a steel centre called "OnCore" which is supposed to fly perfectly straight. And, yes, the original design was approved by the USGA.

I cannot wait to see if a super magnet will affect it… VNS

TEED OFF

with Robert Bicknell

OK… stress and burnout have firmly taken hold and I need a bit of a holiday before my feeble little mind cracks completely. Yeah, I know… whoops, too late. (Beat ya to it, didn't I?)

So, I'm taking off to Ho Tram for a ribbon cutting ceremony at the newest and what, including me, some call the "best golf course" in Viet Nam. That's what I said when I first visited the site. I also said it after the second visit when I played the first nine holes.

I am pretty sure my original opinion will hold up after this visit and the full 18 holes, but we will see. After all, I wouldn't want Ben Styles to get complacent. I'm sure a few hours on the beach will also put me into a nicer frame of mind. To be honest, I've been a rather ill-tempered grouch lately.

In the movie Caddyshack, Rodney Dangerfield had a golf bag which gave him clubs via pneumatic air compression and a remote control. It also had a radio, TV and beer on tap.

He also had a putter which he claimed was given to him by Albert Einstein and had laser assisted alignment, etc. Yes, I know Einstein wasn't around at that time, but that's the point of the joke and the character. Bigger and louder than life.

The movie also had a golf course superintendent who, when he wasn't lopping off the tops of flowers or making explicit gestures with a ball washer, was also growing his own special version of "grass". OK, he also blew up the course while trying to get rid of a single gopher, but you need to see the movie to understand it. And, yes, there are many superintendents who are very close to that character running around loose without medication.

I mention the movie because of the golf bag. Strange and highly non-conforming equipment has been around for a very long time and will continue to be. It's just part of the game and a requirement of innovation. Some pass the test and make it to the shelves, others remain forever in legend.

Over the years, I have seen or heard of clubs made from exotic metals, including parts of a Russian space station, an ICBM and even depleted uranium. Yes, the last one was never put into production and would probably glow in the dark.

I also remember a driver in the 80's which had tennis strings instead of a driver face. I hit a golf ball with a tennis racquet once time and the ball went 475 yards. Unfortunately, it is illegal and would probably require having your driver restrung a few times per year. I cannot belive I actually wrote "having your driver restrung" because that is just soooo wrong on many levels.

I also remember some maniac who stuck a shotgun shell behind the face of a driver with the idea that once you pull the trigger, the faceplate would bash into the ball and send it screaming down the fairway. As you might expect, this was greeted with little enthusiasm by course owners who didn't have a shooting range on the property. As far as I remember, they had a problem with keeping the golf ball from being shredded as well as the police.

So, when I heard about a TaylorMade driver prototype which featured little stabilizing wings coming out of the side and top, I had to smile because, as a fellow maniac, I can fully understand the designer's enthusiasm for such a club. Sure, it's non-conforming, but ya gotta think outside the box in order to invent things that will conform.

Called "MOAD" (The Mother of All Drivers), it had spring loaded wings. They followed that up with "MOAI" (The Mother of All Irons) which had the same features.

Illegal balls have always been a problem ever since the USA changed to a larger ball while England had the smaller ball which played much better in the wind. Gee, links-style courses with lots of wind, go figure.

Now there is a ball with a steel centre called "OnCore" which is supposed to fly perfectly straight. And, yes, the original design was approved by the USGA.

I cannot wait to see if a super magnet will affect it… — VNS

Send Us Your Comments:
Name:
Your E-mail address:
Title:
 

VietNamNews may edit your comments and not all emails will be published.

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