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VietNamNews

Schools need to better vocational training methods

Update: February, 01/2016 - 08:30
Students practise on manufacturing machine at the Tra Vinh University. — VNA/VNS Photo An Hieu

HA NOI (VNS) — The Ministry of Labour, Invalids and Social Affairs (MOLISA) has acknowledged that while the quality of vocational training has improved, there remain areas of inefficiencies, as many vocational schools are not operating at full capacities.

In a written answer to a question raised by Nguyen Van Phuc, a National Assembly deputy from Ha Tinh Province, as to why many vocational schools built at the costs of billions of dong remain idle, even while Viet Nam still lacks skilled and trained workers, the ministry blamed the situation on the fact that the majority of these schools are private and cannot enroll enough students.

Further, poor training methods were cited as the reason that many vocational school graduates cannot find jobs.

A report by MOLISA indicated that 14 vocational schools were established from 2011-15 which provided 3-year training, but were unable to enroll students in 3-year and 2-year training courses. Among them, Dai An Vocational Junior College, LICOGI Technology and Vinalines College, are all privately owned and set up in 2008, 2010 and 2011, respectively, but have not been open for classes because investors cannot arrange for the needed capital, as earlier promised.

Additionally, the Farmers' Association's Central Committee and nine localities across the country have purchased equipment that has not been used because it does not fit into the training curricula.

The Ministry have committed to work with ministries, agencies and localities to supervise the schools to make sure the investments are properly applied. According to the MOLISA, there are 190 vocational junior colleges throughout the country, 280 intermediate vocational schools and 997 vocational centres.

Answering queries on the ability to balance the Social Insurance Fund, MOLISA said studies conducted by the ministry and relevant agencies pointed out that Pension Fund and Death Benefit Funds would not have the capacity to balance between collection and payments in the future.

To ensure the long term sustainability of the fund, the ministry has proposed carrying out a wide range of measures, including receiving payments in accordance with the contribution; adopting innovative practices in the management of social insurance and improving the effectiveness of investments.

Regarding the retirement age, the government has submitted to the National Assembly a draft Law on Social Insurance, which suggests increasing the retirement age to 62 for men and 60 for women as part of the solution for assuring the fund remains healthy.

However, the National Assembly has passed the 2014 Law on Social Insurance, which retains the current retirement ages of 60 for men and 55 for women.

In response to Phuc's question on measures to limit labour-related accidents, the MOLISA said it has focused on policies on occupational safety and hygiene, especially the Law on Occupational Safety and Health which was approved by National Assembly on June 25, 2015.

The Law stipulates that employers are obliged to build, organize and actively coordinate with concerned agencies and organizations to ensure maintaining standards of occupational safety and hygiene at workplaces under their responsibility.

They also are required to compensate workers following labour-related accidents, as well as occupational disease insurance for workers, and implement health care and the detection of occupational diseases.

The Ministry has worked with other ministries, agencies and localities to implement measures to limit work-related accidents and strengthen supervision at high-risk areas, such as construction, mining exploitation and key projects.

Many activities have been conducted by MOLISA, including organizing training on occupational safety and health for employers and workers so employees know about their right to work in safe conditions and employers understand their responsibilities.

The national week on occupational safety and health has been held each year, in a bid to raise awareness for employers and employees. — VNS

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