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VietNamNews

Consumers warned about unlicensed food test kits

Update: December, 01/2015 - 10:43
Department of Food Safety warns consumers to be cautious of buying food testing kits as many of them were not licenced by the authorities. — Photo vietnamplus.vn

HA NOI (VNS) — The Ministry of Health's Department of Food Safety has warned consumers to be cautious of buying food testing kits as many of them were not licenced by the authorities.

The Ministry of Health (MoH) body for food safety said on Monday that in the recent days some products of quick test kits for food advertised on websites maydoantoanthucpham.net and maydothucpham.com were fake, imitated or exaggerated over their licences.

The department gave an example of SOEKS NUC-091-1, one such test kit, which issued instructions on its use allowing customers to get quick tests on nitrate residues in fresh fruits and raw meat made in Russia and imported by a Vietnamese and Russian export-import limited company.

Actually, the authority said, such products were not licenced by any authority or under management of any companies as it said on the label.

Therefore, the authority warned customers not to buy such products, and said they should be very careful when using quick test kits for food, as there were various types in the market without licences from the Ministry of Health.

Food safety remains an unsolved problem in Viet Nam, especially during Tet holiday, experts said,

warning that more and more samples of meat, vegetables and seafood have been found failing hygiene and quality standards recently, threatening the health of local people.

The national food safety strategy from 2011 to 2020 aimed to improve public awareness of such a pressing issue. The strategy aimed to have 70 per cent of food producers and traders, and 80 per cent of managers of concerned agencies, and 70 per cent of consumers, complying with the food safety regulations.

The World Health Organisation (WHO) has estimated that Viet Nam loses VND340 billion ($15.96 million) from food poisoning annually. — VNS


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