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VietNamNews

VN might split manual, automatic training

Update: May, 21/2015 - 10:09
The circular amendment aims to offer a separate training programme for those who want to only learn to drive an automatic, instead of both. It reduces the amount of time spent in training, Minister of Transport Dinh La Thang said. — File Photo

HA NOI (VNS) — Minister of Transport Dinh La Thang urged agencies to study the feasibility of separating car driver training courses into those for automatic and manual vehicles.

The Directorate for Roads of Viet Nam would amend the necessary regulations. The separation of the training courses comes from popular demand, as well as the Ministry of Transport's instructions.

The change has been attributed to a number of accidents in Ha Noi and other localities recently, where drivers have lost control because they're driving a type of car they aren't used to. Though training courses are often taught on manuals, automatic cars have become more popular recently, said Nguyen Van Huyen, Director General of the Directorate for Roads of Viet Nam (DRVN).

The circular amendment aims to offer a separate training programme for those who want to only learn to drive an automatic, instead of both. It reduces the amount of time spent in training, he said.

The DRVN plans to add a rule that prohibits people who obtain driver licences on automatic vehicles from driving manual ones. Drivers who violate the rule will be fined the same as those who don't have a licence. But those who learned to drive on manual cars can drive both.

Manual vehicles are more demanding than automatic ones, due to the difference in training, Huyen said.

However, people who learn on manuals can still do damage without proper training on an automatic. Take the case of Tran Anh Huy, a 44-year-old doctor at Children's Hospital 1 in District 10. Huy's Toyota hit two other cars before crashing into 13 motorbikes stopped at the Ly Thai To-Su Van Hanh intersection on October 7, 2011. One woman was killed on the spot and another succumbed to injuries at the hospital. Seven others were seriously injured.

A number of other countries have separated driver licences for automatic and manual vehicles, Huyen said.

Many people are accustomed to automatic vehicles, but had to learn and pass their tests on manuals, which is a big problem in the Viet Nam licencing system, said Tran Quoc Toan, director of Dong Do Driver Licence Service Centre. Most driver licence service centres in the country only use manual cars. — VNS

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