Thursday, August 24 2017

VietNamNews

Heart surgery moves beyond the scope to the lens

Update: January, 15/2015 - 10:39
In recent years, Viet Nam has seen several advances in the treatment of congenital right-sided heart defects, as well as and more successful surgeries. — Photo nhandan

HCM CITY (VNS) — The annual Viet Nam Congress of Congenital and Structural Heart Disease, which started in HCM City yesterday, will use live broadcasts of heart surgeries performed at Vietnamese and Thai hospitals.

The live broadcasts are intended to help the 200 Vietnamese and foreign cardiologists attending the conference learn more about new state-of-the-art procedures. Discussions and presentations will be held after each broadcast.

Doctors taking part in the three-day conference come from the US, Germany, Thailand, Korea, Japan, Malaysia, Indonesia and other countries.

Of the nearly 8,000 children born with congenital heart disease in Viet Nam each year, 50 per cent have right-sided heart defects, medical director of Tam Duc Heart Hospital said at a press briefing held on Sunday.

Dr. Pham Nguyen Vinh said the most common right-sided defect in Viet Nam is Tetralogy of Fallot, which causes low oxygen levels in the blood. 

Dr Vu Minh Phuc, chairwoman of HCM City Paediatric Cardiology & Congenital Heart Disease Society, also spoke at the Sunday press briefing, explaining that congenital right-sided heart defects are more prevalent in Asia than in Europe or the Americas.

Dr Phuc said that each year the citys two pediatrics hospitals admit more than 400 cases of congenital right-sided heart defects.

In recent years, Viet Nam has seen several advances in the treatment of congenital right-sided heart defects, as well as and more successful surgeries.

Nguyen Minh Tri Vien, head of HCM City Heart Institutes surgical treatment ward, said that close cooperation between surgical and medical wards is needed for cases with complicated right-sided heart defects.

With 19 hospitals and institutes capable of providing heart surgery to children throughout the country, increasing numbers of children have been treated, Phuc said.

However, there is room to improve. Only five of the 19 hospitals have enough resources and skills to treat complex cases such as Tetralogy of Fallot and perform surgeries on infants. — VNS

Send Us Your Comments:

See also: