Tuesday, February 20 2018

VietNamNews

Dak Nong's future lies in hi-tech farming

Update: October, 11/2014 - 10:02
Between 2005 and 2010, the value of the province's agricultural production grew 7.5 per cent per year. By 2012 the sector's total productivity passed VND5 trillion (US$238 million), more than half the province's GDP.— Photo baodulich

HA NOI (VNS)— Vast farming land in the Central Highlands province of Dak Nong would mesh well with socio-economic conditions and high-tech agricultural production, according to the Vietnam Economic Review.

If utilised, the land could greatly increase farm profits, the publication said. Dak Nong wants to use more advanced technology for farming to ensure food security and maintain high environmental sanitation standards. It has already begun seeking investors to help expand the idea.

Dak Nong also hopes to build on an already burgeoning agriculture market. Between 2005 and 2010, the value of the province's agricultural production grew 7.5 per cent per year. By 2012 the sector's total productivity passed VND5 trillion (US$238 million), more than half the province's GDP.

Production value per hectare of cultivated land nearly quadrupled between 2012 and 2013, rising from VND15.9 million ($757) to VND60 million ($2,857).

Dak Nong has already begun planning a 120ha high-tech agricultural zone to develop new methods and implement research projects. The province also hopes to attract scientists and businesses to transfer the latest science and technology to farms in the area.

It has also started offering businesses land and tax incentives to invest in slaughterhouses that use the latest equipment.

In the future, Dak Nong plans to call on more businesses to build seed and animal breeding centres, aquatic breeding centres and dairy farms.

Farmers have already made progress, utilising different methods for farms across the province. Passion fruit is being grown in Dak R'Lap, Tuy Duc, Dak Song and Dak Glong districts; seedless lemons in Dak R'Lap and Tuy Duc districts; and Japanese sweet potatoes in Tuy Duc and Dak Song districts.

Farmers also came up with the idea of growing cocoa in cashew gardens in Dak R'Lap district, palm oil trees in Dak Glong district and green asparagus in Tuy Duc District. They also now farm citrus fruit in Gia Nghia town, Dak Mil and Dak Glong.

Several major crops have seen exceptional growth in output. Coffee production rose from 1.5 tonnes per hectare to 2.3 tonnes per hectare in 2013. Corn increased from five tonnes per hectare to seven tonnes, and rice from four to five tonnes per hectare tosix tonnes per hectare.

Efforts have also been made to ensure sustainable development of cocoa, pepper and coffee production following 4C UTZ-certified processes, which are sustainable agriculture standards.

High-tech agricultural areas have been built across the province. Attention has been paid to following Good Agricultural Practice (GAP) standards, and ensuring use of the best pest prevention and environmental protection models. — VNS


Send Us Your Comments:

See also: