July, 31 2014 09:14:00

Subsidence blamed on residents

Photo Petrotimes

HA NOI (VNS) — Construction conducted by nearby residents has caused the pavement along the O Cho Dua-Hoang Cau road, the most expensive route in Viet Nam that opened early this year, to subside, said Nguyen Sy Bao, the director of the management board on key urban development projects in Ha Noi.

Speaking at the press conference on Tuesday, Bao said the pavement subsided after a short period of construction after residents demolished their old houses. Residents then gathered concrete stakes and drove excavators and trucks over the new pavement.

Bao confirmed that samples of bricks used on the pavement had been tested to meet quality standards.

The loose management and co-operation between the project's investor, inspection consultancy unit and local authority had enabled the damage, he said.

The investor had asked the construction unit to quickly re-build 165 square metres of the damaged pavement, repair the covers of manholes and reduce the height of the pavement to help drivers go up and down more easily.

The pavement had since been fixed, he said, adding that a cost of more than VND70 million (US$3,301) was incurred by the project's contractor.

Bao said the management board would re-examine the incident to establish the fault of those involved, including four units participating in constructing, designing, consulting on and supervising the project.

In June, Ha Noi Party Secretary Pham Quang Nghi had requested a re-examination of the construction of the pavement on the O Cho Dua-Hoang Cau route following inspections.

He said that each phase of the project would reveal the responsibilities of those responsible for the poor-quality pavement.

The O Cho Dua-Hoang Cau road route was part of the city's Belt Road No1 project costing VND642 billion ($30.5 million), including $25 million for site clearance.

However, the real amount for site clearance had been raised to VND743 billion ($35.3 million), making it the most expensive road in the country.

Although the city has opened the road for traffic, the installation of lighting systems, separators, painted lines, pipelines and trees is yet to be finalised. — VNS

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