Updated  
March, 19 2014 16:05:44

Plane believed to have flown into southern Indian Ocean

A map shows the search area for the missing Malaysian Airlines plane in the Indian Ocean during a press conference of the Australian Maritime Safety Authority (AMSA) in Canberra, Australia on March 18. — Photo The Star

KUALA LUMPUR — Investigators probing the disappearance of MAS MH370 believe the plane most likely flew into the southern Indian Ocean, a source close to the investigation said on Wednesday.

An unprecedented search for the Boeing 777-200ER is under way involving 26 nations in two vast search "corridors", one arcing north overland from Laos towards the Caspian Sea, the other curving south across the Indian Ocean from west of Indonesia to west of Australia.

"The working assumption is that it went south, and furthermore that it went to the southern end of that corridor," said the source, who spoke on condition of anonymity.

The view is based on the lack of any evidence from countries along the northern corridor that the plane crossed their airspace, and the failure to find any trace of wreckage in searches in the upper part of the southern corridor.

China said on Wednesday it had not yet found any sign of the aircraft crossing into its territory.

Malaysian and U.S. officials believe the aircraft was deliberately diverted perhaps thousands of miles off course, but an exhaustive background search of the passengers and crew aboard has not yielded anything that might explain why.

MAS flight MH370 vanished from civilian air traffic control screens off Malaysia's east coast at 1.21am. local time on March 8, less than an hour after taking off from Kuala Lumpur for Beijing.

Investigators piecing together patchy data from military radar and satellites believe that someone turned off vital datalinks and turned west, re-crossing Peninsula Malaysia and following a commercial route towards India.

After that, ephemeral pings picked up by one commercial satellite suggest the aircraft flew on for at least six hours, but it is not known for sure if it went north or south. The data from the satellite placed the plane somewhere in one of the two corridors when the final signal was sent at 8.11am.

Last week, a source familiar with official U.S. assessments said it was thought most likely the plane flew south, where it presumably would have run out of fuel and crashed into the sea.— REUTERS


Send Us Your Comments:
Name:
Your E-mail address:
Title:
 

VietNamNews may edit your comments and not all emails will be published.

Highlight

Mountains of coal sludge still threat to lives in Quang Ninh Mountains of coal sludge still threat to lives in Quang Ninh

Wiping sweat from his forehead, 36-year-old Trinh Duc Sang took big strides along a road covered with muddy coal sludge and dirt to the place that was his home until just three weeks ago. He climbed a rickety ladder that buckled under his weight to reach his neigh-bour's house overlooking a creek. From there, he crossed into his old home.

Vietnam Airlines launches new-generation Airbus plane Vietnam Airlines launches new-generation Airbus plane

The national flagship carrier Vietnam Airlines held a ceremony on July 2 to receive its first Airbus 350-900 aircraft and announce its upgrade service quality programme and new brand identifying system, marking a major step in bringing the airline into the international arena.

Wounds begin to heal between US, Viet Nam 1    Wounds begin to heal between US, Viet Nam

Pham Ba Lu swore thousands of times that he "would not live under the same sky as the United States".

Mental disorders affect 10% of Viet Nam's population: MoLISA Mental disorders affect 10% of Viet Nam's population: MoLISA

Nearly 9 million people in Viet Nam, or 10 per cent of the population, suffer from mental disorders, including 2.5 per cent with serious mental illnesses under social protection.