May, 02 2013 09:40:56

Viet Nam turns to culture as part of tourism revival effort

Foreign tourists visit the Royal Citadel in central Thua Thien Hue Province. — VNA Photo

HA NOI (VNS)— A series of festivals kicked off the tourism season over the past week as the industry launched a fight back following news that the number of international vistors to Viet Nam took a dip during the first four months of the year.

The bid to win back trade and showcase the very best of the nation began with the 2013 Hue Traditional Craft Festival which took place from April 27 to May 1.

During the five-day festival, over 1,000 youngsters from across the city participated in a drawing competition under the theme "Hue through the eyes of its children".

Elsewhere, a kite exhibition put the wind up spectators at Hue's cultural museum campus, while the Goddess Ponagar Festival in Nha Trang proved a huge hit on Tuesday, attracting tens of thousands of pilgrims. The latter, an annual event, is held to commemorate the Holy Mother of the Cham community in the central region, who according to Cham legend, taught locals to cultivate land and fashion handicrafts.

Concluding today, the Ponagar Festival combines spiritual rituals with cultural activities, including a requiem and flower floating to pray for peace, happiness and prosperity, together with dancing, singing and the acting out of old stories.

To mark the occasion, Khanh Hoa Province was due to announce a decision made by the Ministry of Culture, Sports and Tourism to recognise the festival as intangible national heritage.

The 1,200-year-old Ponagar tower, built using unique Cham construction techniques, was already recognised as a national historical site in 1979.

The explosion of cultural festivities is hoped to help reverse the latest data from the General Statistics Office, which revealed the number of international visitors to Viet Nam fell 2.4 per cent in April to 610,000.

Overall the country had seen around 2.4 million foreign arrivals in the first four months of 2013, which represented a decrease of 5.3 per cent compared to last year.

According to experts, the fall could be attributed to global economic conditions and the decision to increase single-entry visa fees from US$25 to $45 at the beginning of January.

The experts added that local travel companies and firms were not working in tandem, which pushed up accommodation prices and other services, especially during holidays.

According to an April 16 report from the national steering committee on tourism, high service fees and unscrupulous pricing, especially by taxi drivers and vendors, also contributed to the decrease in visitors.

The committee called for a visa-free policy for major markets such as Japan, South Korea, Russia, Sweden, Denmark, Norway and Finland, as well as visa-free stays for tourists of up to 30 days instead of the current 15.

It also called for measures to boost competitiveness, increase the Government budget for tourism promotions and encourage private companies to play a more prominent role in attracting visitors. — VNS

Send Us Your Comments:
Your E-mail address:

VietNamNews may edit your comments and not all emails will be published.


Mountains of coal sludge still threat to lives in Quang Ninh Mountains of coal sludge still threat to lives in Quang Ninh

Wiping sweat from his forehead, 36-year-old Trinh Duc Sang took big strides along a road covered with muddy coal sludge and dirt to the place that was his home until just three weeks ago. He climbed a rickety ladder that buckled under his weight to reach his neigh-bour's house overlooking a creek. From there, he crossed into his old home.

Doctors treat patients for free at clinic in Ha Noi Doctors treat patients for free at clinic in Ha Noi

For more than 20 years, Dang Thi Nhan, 67, has been waking up about 30 minutes earlier each day to bake cakes or prepare tea for two retired doctors in a clinic near her house in Ha Noi's Giap Bat Ward.

Wounds begin to heal between US, Viet Nam 1    Wounds begin to heal between US, Viet Nam

Pham Ba Lu swore thousands of times that he "would not live under the same sky as the United States".

Water resources, eroding land need saving Water resources, eroding land need saving

Water management has become a major topic of discussion in recent years among Viet Nam's lawmakers, experts and society. The country has been struggling to deal with water-related issues such as a rising sea level, land subsidence and saline intrusion in the Mekong Delta. Lawmakers and experts shared their views on water management with Viet Nam News reporters Thu Van and Hoang Anh.