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Eco experts back ‘green economy'

Update: September, 24/2012 - 10:25

 

A company discharges polluted smoke in HCM City's Tan Binh District. It is an image typical of rapid industrialisation and economic development in Viet Nam which is having a negative impact on the environment. — VNA/VNS Photo Manh Linh
NINH BINH (VNS)— The rapid industrialisation and economic development of Viet Nam over the last 25 years has created a negative impact on the environment according to Nguyen The Chinh, deputy director of the Institute of Strategy and Policy on Natural Resources.

Chinh made the statement in an appearance at a one-day workshop titled "Harmonising Economic Development and Environment Protection in Viet Nam: Practice and Policy Challenges".

He said that the development process led to problems with the ecosystem and that climate change will hugely affect Viet Nam, and added that solutions must be sought that improve the situation without compromising the economic growth rate.

Those present at the workshop, including 20 researchers and 50 representatives from the United Nations Development Programme, the Asia Foundation and the Ministry of Natural Resources and Development, and NGOs discussed methods to both develop the economy effectively and protect the environment across the country.

Chinh drew attention to efforts already being made, particularly in rural areas, to find methods that combine environmental protection with macro economic development.

He also gave his backing to the green economy scale, a fiscal proposal recently submitted to the Prime Minister, which prioritises spending for sustainable growth, social welfare and environmental protection.

But he admitted that this new model scale faces challenges if it is to be imposed. "Before we can approach a new green economy scale we must establish a whole new economic growth model. Its main tasks should be ecosystem restoration and the establishment of a low-carbon society establishment," the deputy director said.

Participants discussed measures that would be needed if the scale is enforced. These include raising awareness, investing in modern technologies, reforming the tax system and committing two per cent of the annual state budget to ecosystem restoration. — VNS

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