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VietNamNews

Misery at home for some HCM City residents

Update: August, 08/2015 - 12:00

Parts of Ho Chi Minh City have become unpleasant places to live.

This is because many people who eat and drink at cafes on the street make a lot of noise.

People who live in nearby buildings cannot sleep properly.

This can make their lives miserable.

Music from Mahalo Beer Club tortures local residents every nights.
Music from Mahalo Beer Club tortures local residents every nights. - Photo tuoitre.vn

HCM CITY (VNS) — Noise pollution from street eateries, public broadcasting speakers, and neighbourhood karaokes has made hundreds of HCM City residents feel as though they are being tortured in their homes.

While affected residents said they could not stand the noise, local authorities in the affected areas claim they have carried out proper measures.

Ngo Hai Thanh (not her real name), a resident in the city's District 12, said she had lost sleep for two weeks because of the noise from customers at a street eatery set up in front of her home.

"The period from 8pm to midnight is the peak time for the eatery. Noise from tens of customers becomes a nightmare," said Thanh, adding that sounds made during cleaning before the caterers leave the site for home ruined her final attempts to sleep.

Thanh works in a lawyer's office and insomnia reduces her productivity.

In Viet Nam, street food is often served with alcohol, and people drinking alcohol speak louder than normal. To cheer their drinking, Vietnamese have their own slogan, "1-2-3-dzo," which is a noisy trademark for Vietnamese street eaters and a nightmare to the ears of those who are not sitting at the table drinking alcohol.

Bach (not her real name), an elderly woman who is a resident of District 1's Tran Quang Khai Street, said noise from eateries on the street caused her illness to worsen. Bach is 80 years old and had heart surgery just weeks ago.

"The eateries stay open until 3:00 in the early morning. Some of these people vomit and urinate on my fence, as well," she added.

Meanwhile, residents in other areas of the city feel that noise from public broadcasting speakers can become unendurable. Since reunification in 1975, authorities installed loud speakers in every community for broadcasting daily news twice a day, in the early morning and at the twilight.

The speakers made a meaningful contribution during the hard times when people could not afford a TV set, a radio or a daily printed newspaper.

"I really need deep sleep after each hard night's shift, but they turn the loud speakers on at 5:20am every morning. This causes me to suffer from insomnia," said Tran Thanh Tuan (not his real name), a resident in suburban Binh Chanh District.

Tuan added that the speaker noise scared his son, awakening him, also.

Residents in Tan Phu District complain that they are fed up with the noise from karaoke, which is quite popular in the district.

Meanwhile, officials in the areas say they have dealt with complaints for many years and issued fines to those making noise.

Dang Hai Binh, deputy head of District 12's natural resources and environment division, was quoted by Tuoi Tre (Youth) newspaper as saying his office had hired individual teams to measure noise levels and issue fines.

However, Binh admitted that customers in eateries obeyed rules only when officials came to check. Afterwards, the noise continued, he said.

Further, Le Ton Thanh, deputy director of HCM City Department of Culture, Sports and Tourism, told the newspaper that monitoring noise pollution was the responsibility of ward authorities. The city authorities, in their licensing process, had regulated permitted noise levels.

Cao Chi Tam, a community head in Binh Chanh District, said loud speaker systems were set at the noise levels required for the propaganda of the ‘new rural' model meant for suburban and rural areas. He promised to reduce the street noise.

However, while officials spoke of restrictions applied to licensed karaoke services and authorised public speakers, no one has proposed a solution for noise from street eateries, which are found on almost every street in the city. — VNS

GLOSSARY

Noise pollution from street eateries, public broadcasting speakers, and neighbourhood karaokes has made hundreds of HCM City residents feel as though they are being tortured in their homes.

Eateries are places where people can buy food and sit down and eat.

Public broadcasting speakers are special speakers that make it possible for a speaker to be heard over a far greater distance, and louder, than his or her voice.

Karaoke is a type of entertainment that involves people singing a song along with an artist on a sound system, often the help in the form of words of songs being displayed on a wall.

"The period from 8pm to midnight is the peak time for the eatery. Noise from tens of customers becomes a nightmare," said Thanh, adding that sounds made during cleaning before the caterers leave the site for home ruined her final attempts to sleep.

A nightmare is a really bad dream. In this case the word is used to describe how something in real life, not while one is asleep, can be really awful.

Thanh works in a lawyer's office and insomnia reduces her productivity.

Insomnia means lack of sleep. If insomnia reduces her productivity, it causes her to not work as well.

To cheer their drinking, Vietnamese have their own slogan, "1-2-3-dzo," which is a noisy trademark for Vietnamese street eaters and a nightmare to the ears of those who are not sitting at the table drinking alcohol.

A trademark, in this case, means something that identifies drinkers.

Meanwhile, residents in other areas of the city feel that noise from public broadcasting speakers can become unendurable.

Unendurable means unbearable.

Since reunification in 1975, authorities installed loud speakers in every community for broadcasting daily news twice a day, in the early morning and at the twilight.

Twilight is the last moments in the evening before darkness sets in.

However, while officials spoke of restrictions applied to licensed karaoke services and authorised public speakers, no one has proposed a solution for noise from street eateries, which are found on almost every street in the city.

To propose means to put forward an idea.

A solution is an answer to a problem.

WORKSHEET

Find words that mean the following in the World Search:

1. A place where you can order a meal.

2. The end of peak time for an eatery in District 12.

3. A type of entertainment that involves singing.

4. Something people may now buy to read the news instead of having to listen to public broadcast systems.

5. An answer to a problem.

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© Duncan Guy/Learn the News/ Viet Nam News 2015


































 

 1. Midnight; 2. eatery; 3. karaoke; 4. newspaper; 5. solution.

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