Monday, December 18 2017

VietNamNews

Elephants under threat

Update: October, 06/2013 - 12:00

There are wild elephants in Viet Nam, but not many.

Fewer than one hundred and thirty of the creatures are left.

People have been shooting them for their tusks as well as other body parts.

Now, students are becoming involved in a project to help save the last of these elephants.

According to the Viet Nam Forest Protection Department, in 2010 there were fewer than 130 individuals of wild Asian Elephants left in Viet Nam.
According to the Viet Nam Forest Protection Department, in 2010 there were fewer than 130 individuals of wild Asian Elephants left in Viet Nam. - Photo vtv

 

HCM CITY (VNS)— More than 30,000 secondary school students in HCM City will take part in wildlife conservation activities, with a focus on Asian Elephant conservation under the SOS programme that kicked off yesterday.

Under the programme, which is co-organised by the non-profit organisation Wildlife At Risk (WAR), the city's Department of Education and Training and the city's Forest Protection Division, seventh-grade students at schools in Binh Thanh District will learn about wildlife through biology.

As many as 1,000 secondary students and teachers from the districts of Tan Phu, Tan Binh, Binh Tan and Go Vap will visit the Cu Chi Wildlife Rescue Station during the academic year.

"The SOS traveling exhibition, which was launched at the end of 2011, has received positive feedback from secondary school teachers and students," said Nguyen Hoai Chuong, deputy director of the city's Department of Education and Training.

The SOS traveling exhibition is a 60-sq.m tent with various interactive exhibits, models, objects and games to show students threats to wildlife.

Twenty-eight wild elephants and 10 domestic elephants in Viet Nam have died in the last four years, according to statistics released by WAR.

According to the Viet Nam Forest Protection Department, in 2010 there were fewer than 130 individuals of wild Asian Elephants left in Viet Nam.

A survey on the consumption of wild animal products conducted by WAR in 2011 showed that elephants were being used for ornamental purposes, mostly in HCM City.

Previously, most male elephants were killed for their precious tusks. But now female and baby elephants were also being killed for their skin, trunks, soles of their feet, teeth, bones, meat and tails, all of which have commercial value.

"The department is committed to place wildlife education into biology classes for grade seven with an aim to educate students to save wildlife from illegal consumption," Chuong said.

WAR has worked with several agencies to combat wildlife crimes that are often reported by students as well as local residents, said Nguyen Vu Khoi, WAR's CEO. — VNS

GLOSSARY

Under the programme, which is co-organised by the non-profit organisation Wildlife At Risk (WAR), the city's Department of Education and Training and the city's Forest Protection Division, seventh-grade students at schools in Binh Thanh District will learn about wildlife through biology.

Biology is the study of living things, both plants and animals.

The SOS traveling exhibition is a 60-sq.m tent with various interactive exhibits, models, objects and games to show students threats to wildlife.

Interactive exhibits are things on display that people can get responses from.

Previously, most male elephants were killed for their precious tusks. But now female and baby elephants were also being killed for their skin, trunks, soles of their feet, teeth, bones, meat and tails, all of which have commercial value.

The soles of one's feet are the bottom of one's feet.

If something has commercial value, it can be bought or sold.

"The department is committed to place wildlife education into biology classes for grade seven with an aim to educate students to save wildlife from illegal consumption," Chuong said.

If wildlife is consumed, it is used. This may mean that its skin is used, its meat is eaten or, in the case of the elephant, its tusks are used for carving and in the case of rhino, its horns are used for medicine. There are laws in many countries to protect endangered animals from being killed so that people can use their body parts, or things made from their body parts. If people disobey these rules they are taking part in the illegal consumption of wildlife.

WAR has worked with several agencies to combat wildlife crimes that are often reported by students as well as local residents, said Nguyen Vu Khoi, WAR's CEO.

To combat wildlife crimes means to act against them.

A CEO is a chief executive officer.

 

WORKSHEET

Find the meanings of the following words in the Word Search:

1.      An animal that carries ivory tusks.

2.      A science that is to do with living plants and animals.

3.      Something called an acronym that stands for Wildlife at Risk.

4.      The grade in which students at schools in Binh Thanh District will learn about wildlife.

5.      The kind of building that houses the SOS traveling exhibition.

6.      The number of domestic elephants in Viet Nam that have died in the last four years.

 

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1. Elephant; 2. Biology; 3. War; 4. Seventh; 5.tent; 6. Ten.

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