June, 09 2012 08:00:03

Ca Mau sets up measures to stop erosion, protect families


A part of the dyke in Ca Mau Province's U Minh District were slided by sea water. Nearly 100 sites in the provinces face risks of being eroded. — VNA/VNS Photo Duy Khuong
CA MAU — Nearly 100 sites in the southernmost province of Ca Mau are at risk of being severely eroded during this year's storm season, according to the province's Department of Agriculture and Rural Development.

Many high-risk sites are located at the mouths of Doc, Khanh Hoi, Bo De and Tam Giang rivers, causing land erosion of three to five metres annually in recent years.

The Cua Lon River running though Nam Can and Ngoc Hien districts is near the sea, and its flow is very strong, eroding four to five metres of land every year.

Other erosion-prone sites are located along the 100-km Western Sea Dyke, the 40-km Eastern Sea Dyke, the Trem and Gianh Hao rivers as well as the Doi Cuong Canal, and more than 300km of river routes that flow into the sea.

More than 1,200 households live on the 100 erosion-prone sites.

Residents in the Cuu Long (Mekong) Delta often build houses along the banks and mouths of rivers so they can make a living.

Nam Can District's Song Doc Town has nearly 450 families living in stilt houses, half of them located on the river and half of them located on land. Song Doc Town has a population of 800,000.

Every year Ca Mau has 20 to 30 land erosion cases, which have caused dozens of houses to slide into the river.

Many residents, who do not know much about natural disasters, continue to live in these houses.

The province's authorities are taking steps to protect families. At the beginning of this year's rainy season, they relocated about 300 households living in the protected forest of the Western Sea Dyke to resettlement areas.

They have also improved the campaign to raise awareness of local residents about the prevention of natural disasters, land erosion and the rise of sea-water levels.

Families living along erosion-prone riverbanks have also been asked to prepare life-jackets in case of natural disasters. — VNS

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